Threats and Trends in the Internet of Things

We recently came across an IBM trend report on the Internet of Things.  With our SecureM2M solution now available for download, Netop is working to pull together diverse resources to help our customers and partners understand how connectivity is evolving in the Internet of Things.  Here are some of the key points we’ve pulled from “Internet of Things: A HorizonWatching 2014 Trend Report:”

 

Look into the crystal ball...Automakers are setting the pace.  No surprise, the auto industry was among the first to embed smart systems.  Market pressures will continue to drive the industry to innovate – and increase the need for manufactures to find agile ways to support customers.  Before long, you’re car will need an IT pro as much as a mechanic.

More sensors and devices will include wireless connectivity. The proliferation of devices equals a proliferation of data being shared between devices and with centralized data systems.  New IOT apps will be required to integrate all of this data into core business applications.

The cloud is the core.  The boom in data will require more cloud-based applications for storing, aggregating, analyzing, and integrating the data. Cloud-based connectivity is a prerequisite for sharing data and managing sensors, controls and other devices on the Internet of Things.

Security is a key component of any IoT strategy.  More devices, more connections and more entry points means increased system vulnerability.  While taking steps to plan a forward-looking strategy to ensure secure connections and data integrity, it is important to keep in mind legacy devices already in place and craft a plan that addresses the challenges they present.

The impact of legacy devices on securing the Internet of Things was a central point in Bruce Schneier’s must-read piece in the January 2014 issue of Wired.  When Schneier writes “we have an incipient disaster in front of us,” he points out that we have a multitude of devices that are interconnected but a “market dynamic that has inhibited updates and prevented anyone else from updating.” The scenario presented by hundreds of millions of devices running on old software, very rarely with security patches applied, and connected to the Internet is chilling and ripe for exploitation.  Check out the full article – “There’s No Good Way to Patch the Internet of Things and That’s a Huge Problem” – here.ies. Developing a network strategy that allows for communication between devices – and for employee and out-of-band access to devices – is crucial for maximizing the IoT value.

 

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